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Jiu-Jitsu University

Pinned on March 19, 2019 at 4:00 am by Raymond Bowman

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Jiu-Jitsu University

Saulo Ribeiro—six-time Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu World Champion—is world-renowned for his functional jiu-jitsu knowledge and flawless technique. In Jiu-Jitsu University, Ribeiro shares with the public for the first time his revolutionary system of grappling, mapping out more than 200 techniques that carry you from white to black belt. Illuminating common jiu-jitsu errors and then illustrating practical remedies, this book is a must for all who train in jiu-jitsu. Not your run-of-the-mill technique book, Jiu-Jitsu University is a detailed training manual that will ultimately change the way jiu-jitsu is taught around the globe.


Comments

Anonymous says:

Excellent guide for the road ahead

Anonymous says:

Great Foundation for BJJ This is the first book I purchased upon starting BJJ – disclaimer, I’m only at year two now. It should be clear that this book covers NO-STRIKING grappling. This is not Japanese Jiu Jitsu, this is Brazilian Jiu Jitsu. This does not cover self-defense or MMA but could carry over with modification – first and foremost this is an instructional on, I would say, “competition” BJJ. For example, when you are in bottom mount, you know he is not going to punch you in the face so you can and should keep your elbows down and close to your body. If it were self-defense/MMA – you’d probably want to bridge as soon as possible and trap and roll but I don’t know enough about that. I do not doubt that Saulo or any competent BJJer could handle himself in a striking environment but that is not what this book is about.Overall the book is beautiful, printed on thick paper with large color photos. The book is divided up by belt and the techniques Saulo associated with each belt:White – Survival, just concentrate on not getting tapped.Blue – EscapingPurple – Guard PositionsBrown – Passing the GuardBlack – SubmissionsI think his rationale is genius. Everyone’s natural talents and skills differ, but I know for me, I spent a whole lot of time in inferior positions when I first started and rarely got the chance to even try for a submission. So reading from a Pro that the art of survival was worth mastering in of itself gave me a great perspective, helped with motivation and setting expectations. It became that much more fun to go train with an eye on mastering survival first and paying my dues before expecting that I would hit submissions and reversals.His rationale in a nutshell for mastering your survival positions: Once you are confident your opponent cannot tap you, you are more relaxed and this frees up your energy and time to concentrate on escaping, passing, positioning, and submitting.Saulo points out many details about his survival positions: your preemptive position so that you can safely chill out while in an inferior position – or at least really make the other guy work for the tap.When I first started, I grappled nearly exclusively in no-gi. Yet, while this book is 100% gi, I would say most of the book’s concepts do well for no-gi, save for the submission section which is gi focused of course. The basics are valid for no-gi and gi. For example, escaping with no-gi is just like with gi – it’s even easier since there is less friction.I have to say, some of his points are subtle and are hidden in the photos – I wish these were a little clearer. For example, in his section covering bottom mount survival, he lies slightly on his side [instead of completely on his back] – at first glance, this was imperceptible to me, perhaps because the gi is naturally baggy and so that subtly is lost. That point and other similar points could have been more explicit, perhaps with no-gi complementary photos or written in text. I wish there were bullet points of key points, that would have been great. Overall though, you can glean a lot of information from the photos if you go over them again and again. It’s all the little things!The book is huge. There are many positions and techniques that have never even presented themselves to me yet – he gives you a whole lot to think about and work on week after week.At least one time in the book, the Point of View of instruction changes from Saulo to his brother – this was VERY confusing to me until I figured out what was going on. In other words, for most of the book, the text is describing what Saulo is doing or should do – then in another technique it switches to Xande’s perspective. That’s fine to switch it up, but there was no notice to the reader that I can recall. No biggie if you know this.Now that I’ve had a bit more experience and have, hopefully, learned a few things, I know some of the techniques taught in the book do not work for me, or just aren’t my specialty and I’ve found other tools that better suit me. Everyone’s game is a little different. For example, there are more than a few ways to escape side mount or get the clock choke [ all the little things] and everyone has his favorite particular way that works for him. So Saulo is showing what works for him but it might not work for you. I wouldn’t expect any book to show me THE definitive way to do BJJ, but this definitively a worthwhile foundation. My personal example here is that Saulo emphasizes the bridge a whole bunch for his escapes. If you are bottom side mount he would say to bridge, hip escape to make room, then recover guard. I’ve found this can be difficult if your opponent is a reasonable size bigger than you and really know has to weigh down. The solution is to combo your escape techniques, not just depend on the standard bridge.Prefacing each chapter is some great…


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